Today's Schedule:   Exam A
 
 
Science
 
 

Click on the headings below to read an overview of each Science course offered at Holy Cross.

  • Science 5

    The focus of fifth grade science is to further develop an understanding of fundamental concepts from each of the science strands. The emphasis is on developing inquiry skills and acquiring more depth in content knowledge.

     

    Objectives:

    • Science as Inquiry: The student will engage in partial and full inquiries that are within their developmental capabilities.
    • Life Science: The students will become aware of the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and connect their relationships to each other and their environment.
    • Earth and Space Science: The students will develop an understanding of the properties of earth materials, the structure of the earth system, the earth history, and the earth’s place in the universe.
    • Science and the Environment: Students will develop an appreciation of the natural environment, learn the importance of environmental quality, and acquire a sense of stewardship. As consumers and citizens, they will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world.
  • Middle School STEM courses: Design & Modeling, Robotics, Medical Detectives

    Design and Modeling (DM) provides 5th grade students opportunities to apply the design process to creatively solve problems. Students are introduced to a unit problem in the first activity and are asked to make connections to the problem throughout the lessons in the unit. Students learn and utilize methods for communicating design ideas through sketches, solid models, and mathematical models. Students will understand how models can be simulated to represent an authentic situation and generate data for further analysis and observations. Students work in teams to identify design requirements, research the topic, and engage stakeholders. Specifically, teams will design a toy or game for a child with cerebral palsy, fabricate and test it, and make necessary modifications to optimize the design solution.

     

    Beginning in the 2017-2018 school year, 6th grade students will be introduced to the field of robotics, and the 7th grade students will investigate a Medical Detectives curriculum.

  • Science 6

    Science 6 is for those students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Science 5. The study of physical science in 6th grade encompasses a broad range of topics focused on concepts in chemistry, physics, and technology.

     

     

    Objectives:

    • Students will learn how scientists investigate the natural world.
    • Students will identify and apply the skills that scientists use, as well as learning about scientific inquiry.
    • Students will engage in partial and full inquiries that are within their developmental capabilities.
    • Students will develop an understanding of the characteristics and interrelationships of matter and energy in the physical world.
    • Students will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world.

     

    The student books are consumable, which provides unique opportunities to become totally engaged. The books are divided into four sections: Science and Technology, Introduction to Chemistry, Forces and Energy, and Sound and Light.

  • Science 7

    Science 7 is for those students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Science 6.

     

    This course delves into the theories, principles, and practices of life science. Emphasis is placed on the study of the cell and its functions, heredity and genetics, an introduction to evolution, a comprehensive look at plants and animals, the structure and purpose of human body systems, and an in-depth view of ecology and the environment.

     

    Objectives:

    • To reintroduce and pursue, at an increased complexity, an understanding of life science
    • To discover the wonders of the world of life science and all that it entails
    • To help students make a connection between what they are studying in their book and the larger world around them
    • To reinforce basic scientific principles, such as scientific method and observation
    • To foster a better understanding of the sciences as a whole
    • To encourage the curious, creative spark inside each student

     

    Upon completion of Science 7, the student will be able to demonstrate comprehension of basic life science principles and ideas.

  • Science 7 Accelerated

    Science 7A is for those students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Science 6. The most successful students in an accelerated course are those who are both well prepared and highly motivated. Admission to an accelerated course at Holy Cross usually depends on a combination of the student’s interest in the subject, a superior academic record, and above-average standardized test scores.

    This course delves into the theories, principles, and practices of life science. Emphasis is placed on the study of the cell and its functions, heredity and genetics, an introduction to evolution, a comprehensive look at plants and animals, the structure and purpose of human body systems, and an in-depth view of ecology and the environment.

     

    Course Objectives:

    • To reintroduce and pursue, at an increased complexity, an understanding of life science
    • To discover the wonders of the world of life science and all that it entails
    • To help students make a connection between what they are studying in their book and the larger world around them
    • To reinforce basic scientific principles, such as scientific method and observation
    • To foster a better understanding of the sciences as a whole
    • To encourage the curious, creative spark inside each student

     

    Upon completion of Science 7A, the student will be able to demonstrate comprehension of basic life science principles and ideas.

  • Earth Science

    Earth Science is a required course for all Holy Cross students. The student must have successfully mastered the objectives of Science 7.

     

    Earth Science is the study of Earth, and its place in the universe. It includes geology, oceanography, astronomy, and meteorology. Students will be educated on topics pertaining to the four different sciences that fall under the realm of Earth Science, as well how each individual science affects our knowledge and understanding of the Earth and its place in the universe. The primary goal of Earth Science is to educate students about the many facets of Earth and how we gain more information about them. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to identify, describe, and discuss key concepts pertaining to:

    • Earth’s structure
    • Earth’s surface
    • Water on Earth
    • Earth’s atmosphere
    • Astronomy and Space
    • Louisiana wetlands
  • Earth Science Honors

    Earth Science is a required course for all Holy Cross students. The student must have successfully mastered the objectives of Science 7. The most successful students in an honors course are those who are both well prepared and highly motivated. Admission to an honors course at Holy Cross School usually depends on a student’s interest in the subject as well as a superior academic record.

     

    Earth Science is the study of Earth and its place in the universe. It includes geology, oceanography, astronomy, meteorology, and environmental science. Students will be educated on topics pertaining to the five different sciences that fall under the realm of Earth Science, as well as how each individual science affects our knowledge and understanding of Earth and its place in the universe. The primary goal of Earth Science is to educate students about the many facts of Earth; how each interdisciplinary topic connects to the other topics; and how we gain more information about the topics. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to identify, analyze, interpret and discuss key concepts pertaining to:

     

    • Earth’s Structure
    • Earth’s Surface
    • Water on Earth
    • Earth's atmosphere
    • Astronomy and Spacew
    • Louisiana Wetlands
    • Enviornmental Science

     

    In addition to the increased rigor and demand, students enrolled in Earth Science Honors must complete and submit a project for entry into the Greater New Orleans Science and Engineering Fair. This project will also be factored into the student’s overall grade at the end of each semester.

  • Physical Science

    Physical Science is a required course for all Holy Cross students. The student must have successfully mastered the objectives for Earth Science.

     

    Physical Science will provide students with a basic understanding of light, energy, and their measurement. It includes the study of the basics of electricity, sound, magnetism, radioactivity, and physical matter. The subject provides students with the foundation to continue study of complex scientific concepts.

     

    The primary goal of Physical Science is to educate students about the many facets of this unique science. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to identify, describe, and discuss key concepts in Physical Science as they pertain to:

    • Chemistry
    • Physics
    • Mathematics
    • Space Science
    • Biology
    • Environmental Science
  • Physical Science Honors

    Physical Science is a required course, taken by any student classified as a freshman in high school. The student must have satisfied the requirements for Earth Science. Physical Science Honors is open to students who have taken Earth Science; previous science courses must have been passed with an ‘A’ or ‘B’ grade. Admission to an Honors course at Holy Cross School ordinarily depends on the student’s interest in the subject as well as on a superior academic record. Experience has shown that the most successful students in Honors courses are those who are both well prepared and highly motivated.

     

    Physical Science Honors will provide students with an understanding of light, energy, and their measurement. It includes the study of the basics of electricity, sound magnetism, radioactivity, and physical matter. The subject provides students with the foundation to further study topics among the many other sciences. Students should expect to be challenged with a rigorous curriculum, incorporating an emphasis on critical thinking and standardized test preparation. The primary goal of Physical Science is to educate students about the many facets of this unique science. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to identify, describe, and discuss key concepts in Physical Science as they pertain to:

    • Chemistry
    • Physics
    • Mathematics
    • Space Science
    • Biology
    • Environmental Science

     

    In addition to the increased rigor and demand, students enrolled in Physical Science Honors must complete and submit a project for entry into the Greater New Orleans Science and Engineering Fair. This project will also be factored into the student’s overall grade at the end of each semester.

  • Biology I

    Biology I is a required science course for all Holy Cross students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Earth Science and Physical Science.

     

    Biology I, the study of life, is a laboratory-dependent course designed to introduce students to the science processes, skills, and understandings related to a wide range of biological topics. Topics covered will include the nature of scientific inquiry, cell biology, genetics & gene expression, human anatomy and physiology, evolution, ecology, and taxonomy. During this course, students learn to identify the basic questions and concepts that guide scientific investigation. Important skills developed throughout this course include microscopy, graphing and measurement, identification of research questions, making connections, and the ability to be a self-directed learner.

     

    Course Objectives:

    • To understand and appreciate the unifying characteristics, diversity and complexity of living things
    • To understand the concept of the cell as a building-block
    • To be able to measure and evaluate theories, hypotheses and natural laws which are pertinent to the study of life
    • To understand the biological processes that are responsible for producing and converting energy
    • To understand the genetic relationship among all living things
    • To relate all living things through the unifying theme of evolution
    • To acquire knowledge of human anatomy and physiology.

     

    Students in 10th grade must choose to prepare a Science Fair project OR a Social Studies Fair project. Any student who does not take a Social Studies class during 10th grade must participate in Science Fair, and this project is factored into the student’s overall grade at the end of each semester.

  • Biology I Honors

    Biology I Honors, the study of life, is a laboratory-dependent course designed to introduce students to the science processes, skills, and understandings related to a wide range of biological topics. Topics covered will include the nature of scientific inquiry, cell biology, genetics & gene expression, human anatomy and physiology, evolution, ecology, and taxonomy. During this course, students learn to identify the basic questions and concepts that guide scientific investigation. Important skills developed throughout this course include microscopy, graphing a measurement, identification of research questions, making connections, and the ability to be a self-directed learner.

     

    Biology I Honors is open to students who have taken Earth Science and Physical Science; all previous science courses must have been passed with an ‘A’ or ‘B’ grade. Admission to an Honors course at Holy Cross School ordinarily depends on the student’s interest in the subject as well as on a superior academic record. Experience has shown that the most successful students in Honors courses are those who are both well prepared and highly motivated.

     

    Objectives:

    • To understand and appreciate the unifying characteristics, diversity and complexity of living things
    • To understand the concept of the cell as a building-block
    • To be able to measure and evaluate theories, hypotheses and natural laws which are pertinent to the study of life
    • To understand the biological processes that are responsible for producing and converting energy
    • To understand the genetic relationship between all living things
    • To relate all living things through the unifying theme of evolution
    • To acquire knowledge of human anatomy and physiology.

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    In addition to the increased rigor and demand, students enrolled in Biology I Honors must complete and submit a project for entry into the Greater New Orleans Science and Engineering Fair. This project will also be factored into the student’s overall grade at the end of each semester.

  • Biology II

    Biology II extends the principles and concepts of Biology I. Emphasis is placed on advanced comparative anatomy, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, classification of organisms, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Required lab investigations and special projects supplement this course.

     

    The objectives of Biology II are to reinforce concepts from Biology I to the prospective college student:

    • To understand and appreciate the unifying characteristics, diversity and complexity of living things
    • To integrate the basic physical, chemical and biological disciplines in the study of life
    • To be able to measure and evaluate theories, hypotheses and natural laws which are pertinent to the study of life
    • To investigate the physiological activities of life
    • To identify ecological problems in the biosphere
    • To acquire advanced biological techniques and skills through practical experiences in the laboratory
    • To acquire effective written and oral communication skills.
  • Biology II Honors

    Biology II Honors is designed for students who excel in science. The pace of this course will be faster and will cover the material in greater depth than Biology II. It is expected that students taking Biology II will be well-prepared and highly motivated, giving their best effort to keep up with the rigor, higher order thinking and higher expectations needed to be successful.

     

    This course extends the principles and concepts of Biology II. Emphasis is placed on advanced comparative anatomy, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, classification of organisms, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Required lab investigations and special projects supplement this course. The objectives of Biology II Honors are to reinforce concepts from Biology I Honors to the prospective college student.

     

    Course objectives:

    • To understand and appreciate the unifying characteristics, diversity and complexity of living things
    • To integrate the basic physical, chemical and biological disciplines in the study of life
    • To be able to measure and evaluate theories, hypotheses and natural laws which are pertinent to the study of life
    • To investigate the physiological activities of life
    • To identify ecological problems in the biosphere
    • To acquire advanced biological techniques and skills through practical experiences in the laboratory
    • To acquire effective written and oral communication skills.

     

    Upon Completion of Biology II Honors, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels.

  • AP Biology II

    The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. The textbook used for AP Biology will be one used by college biology majors, and the kinds of labs done by AP students will be the equivalent of those done by college students. This course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. AP Biology will include those topics regularly covered in a college biology course for biology majors, in the context of the four Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes governing living organisms & biological systems:

    • Big Idea 1: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.
    • Big Idea 2: Biological systems utilize free energy & molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce, & maintain dynamic homeostasis.
    • Big Idea 3: Living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes.
    • Big Idea 4: Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.

     

    The main goals of AP Biology are to help students:

    • develop a conceptual framework for modern biology.
    • grasp science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts.
    • gain personal experience in scientific inquiry.
    • recognize the unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology.
    • apply biological knowledge & critical thinking to environmental/social concerns.

     

    Students enrolled in AP Biology are required to take the AP exam given in May by CollegeBoard.

  • Chemistry I

    Chemistry is a required science course for all Holy Cross students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Earth Science, Physical Science, and Biology I.

     

    Science can be viewed as the ongoing attempt to organize and describe the properties of nature. Chemistry is the branch of science that studies the relationship between the structure and properties of matter. This course is designed to introduce basic chemistry concepts as well as develop laboratory procedure skills including writing lab reports. This course will study the development of the fundamental principles of chemistry and their applications. Chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding theories, thermochemistry, periodic properties, solution calculations, gas laws and the properties of solids and liquids are among the topics discussed.

     

    Students will be able to:

    • Differentiate among the states of matter
    • Describe physical changes & chemical changes
    • Classify matter
    • List and use the SI units of measurement & convert measurements to scientific notation
    • Apply dimensional analysis to metric conversion problems
    • Explain Dalton’s theory; identify the Bohr model of an atom
    • Identify 3 types of subatomic particles & explain the difference between elements and isotopes
    • Describe the energies and positions of electrons according to quantum mechanics
    • Describe how to write electron configurations
    • Describe the relationship between wavelength and frequency
    • Explain how elements are organized in the periodic table & describe trends in atomic size
    • Explain how ions form & describe the properties of an ionic compound
    • Determine the number of valence electrons in an atom of a representative element
    • Describe how covalent bonds are formed
    • Define Avagadro’s number as it relates to a mole
    • Describe the steps for balancing equation
    • Calculate stoichiometric quantities from balanced chemical equations
    • Perform calculations using gas laws
  • Chemistry I Honors

    Chemistry Honors is designed for students who excel in science and have successfully mastered the objectives of Earth Science, Physical Science and Biology I.

     

    Chemistry I Honors is open to students who have taken Earth Science, Biology, and Physical Science; previous science courses must have been passed with an ‘A’ or ‘B’ grade. Additionally, students must have taken Algebra II and have passed with an ‘A’ or ‘B’ grade. Admission to an Honors course at Holy Cross School ordinarily depends on the student’s interest in the subject as well as on a superior academic record. Experience has shown that the most successful students in Honors courses are those who are both well prepared and highly motivated.

     

    Science can be viewed as the ongoing attempt to organize and describe the properties of nature. Chemistry is the branch of science that studies the relationship between the structure and properties of matter. This course is designed to give a rigorous introduction to basic chemistry, as well as to develop laboratory procedure skills, including writing lab reports. This course will study the development of the fundamental principles of chemistry and their applications. Chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding theories, thermochemistry, periodic properties, solution calculations, gas laws and the properties of solids and liquids are among the topics discussed.

     

    Objectives:

    • Differentiate among the states of matter
    • Describe physical changes & chemical changes
    • Classify matter
    • List and use the SI units of measurement & convert measurements to scientific notation
    • Apply dimensional analysis to metric conversion problems
    • Explain Dalton’s theory; identify the Bohr model of an atom
    • Identify 3 types of subatomic particles & explain the difference between elements and isotopes
    • Describe the energies and positions of electrons according to quantum mechanics
    • Describe how to write electron configurations
    • Describe the relationship between wavelength and frequency
    • Explain how elements are organized in the periodic table & describe trends in atomic size
    • Explain how ions form & describe the properties of an ionic compound
    • Determine the number of valence electrons in an atom of a representative element
    • Describe how covalent bonds are formed
    • Define Avagadro’s number as it relates to a mole
    • Describe the steps for balancing equation
    • Calculate stoichiometric quantities from balanced chemical equations
    • Perform calculations using gas laws
    • Identify the factors that influence solubility
    • Solve problems with molarity
    • Explain how energy, heat, and work are related
    • Describe how to express the rate of a chemical reaction
    • Identify stresses that can change equilibrium

     

    In addition to the increased rigor and demand, students enrolled in Chemistry I Honors must complete and submit a project for entry into the Greater New Orleans Science and Engineering Fair. This project will also be factored into the student’s overall grade at the end of each semester.

  • AP Chemistry II

    The AP Chemistry course is equivalent in content, depth, and complexity to an introductory chemistry course at the college level. This course is designed to prepare the student to excel on the AP exam offered in May, and follows the AP curriculum closely. AP Chemistry is an in-depth, content-intensive study of chemical principles that allows students the opportunity to engage hands-on in scientific experimentation. Units of study include chemical reactions, modern atomic theory, molecular bonding, hybridization, organic chemistry, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, aqueous equilibrium, acids, bases, precipitation, reduction, oxidation, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Successful completion of Chemistry I Honors is a prerequisite.

     

    Students enrolled in AP Chemistry are required to take the AP exam given in May by CollegeBoard.

  • Anatomy & Physiology

    The Anatomy and Physiology course surveys the structure and function of the human body. Students that have interest in careers in medicine, therapy, nutrition or athletic training should take this course. Topics include nutrition and metabolism, tissues, muscles, bones and joints, cardiology, and reproduction. Students perform several labs related to nutrition, metabolism, and cardiology, and they perform a full dissection. As a lecture-based course, students are expected to work independently as this course is modeled after university-level anatomy courses.

     

    Objectives:

    • Understand and appreciate the unifying characteristics, diversity and complexity of living things
    • Relate anatomical and physiological adaptation to its phylogenetic origins
    • Discover the importance of water to all physiology and chemical processes
    • Practice healthy nutritional lifestyles
    • Acquire knowledge of the 11 vertebrate systems and apply this knowledge
    • Articulate the interrelatedness of all systems and the dependence of each system on the others
    • Acquire advanced biological techniques and skills through practical experiences in the laboratory
    • Acquire effective written and oral communication skills
  • Anatomy & Physiology Honors

    The Anatomy and Physiology course surveys the structure and function of the human body. Students that have interest in careers in medicine, therapy, nutrition or athletic training should take this course. Topics include nutrition and metabolism, tissues, muscles, bones and joints, cardiology, and reproduction. Students perform several labs related to nutrition, metabolism, and cardiology, and they perform a full dissection. As a lecture-based course, students are expected to work independently as this course is modeled after university-level anatomy courses. Compared to non-honors Anatomy and Physiology, the honors course will move at a quicker pace and cover more material, and assessments will be more rigorous.

     

    Objectives:

    • Understand and appreciate the unifying characteristics, diversity and complexity of living things
    • Relate anatomical and physiological adaptation to its phylogenetic origins
    • Discover the importance of water to all physiology and chemical processes
    • Practice healthy nutritional lifestyles
    • Acquire knowledge of the 11 vertebrate systems and apply this knowledge
    • Articulate the interrelatedness of all systems and the dependence of each system on the others
    • Acquire advanced biological techniques and skills through practical experiences in the laboratory
    • Acquire effective written and oral communication skills
  • Environmental Science

    Environmental Science is for students who have completed one year of Earth Science, Physical Science, Biology I, and either have completed or are concurrently enrolled in Chemistry I. Environmental Science is the study of the natural sciences in an interdisciplinary context that includes the role of people and their influences on these natural systems. It includes biology, earth and atmospheric sciences, fundamental principles of chemistry and physics, human population dynamics, and an appreciation for biological and natural resources. Increasingly, active citizenship requires scientific understanding of our world. Students will explore societal and technological issues and increase their abilities in group-decision-making, while investigating relevant environmental science content at personal, community and global levels.

     

    Course Objectives:

    • To provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world
    • To identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made
    • To evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems
    • To examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

     

    Students who complete Environmental Science will:

    • Understand natural processes and systems
    • Evaluate the reliability of available information
    • Discuss and write articulately about the many facets of environmental issues
    • Read current primary scientific literature as well as popular environmental literature
    • Gain practical experience in both field work and in laboratory work
    • Apply concepts learned to new information that arises
    • Progress through an environmental hierarchy from Knowledge, Understanding, & Appreciation to Stewardship.
  • Environmental Science Honors

    Environmental Science Honors is designed for students who excel in science and have successfully mastered the objectives of Earth Science, Physical Science and Biology I. The student must have completed Chemistry I Honors or be concurrently enrolled in Chemistry I Honors. Previous science courses must have been passed with an ‘A’ or ‘B’ grade. Admission to an Honors course at Holy Cross depends on the student’s interest in the subject as well as on a superior academic record. Experience has shown that the most successful students in Honors courses are those who are both well prepared and highly motivated.

     

    Environmental Science Honors is the study of the natural sciences in an interdisciplinary context that includes the role of people and their influences on these natural systems. It includes biology, earth and atmospheric sciences, fundamental principles of chemistry and physics, human population dynamics, and an appreciation for biological and natural resources. This Honors section will also include environmental economics, public policy, environmental legislation and literature. Designed as a course to provide college-level science work for students who would typically not be attracted to the other more analytical sciences.

     

    The primary objective of Environmental Science Honors is to help students become environmentally literate citizens familiar with the science and the present policy on current environmental issues. The objectives of the Environmental Science Honors course are:

    • To provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world
    • To identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made
    • To evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems
    • To examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

     

    Students who complete Environmental Science Honors will:

    • Understand natural processes and systems
    • Evaluate the reliability of available information
    • Discuss and write articulately about the many facets of environmental issues
    • Read current primary scientific literature as well as popular environmental literature
    • Gain practical experience in both field work and in laboratory work
    • Apply concepts learned to new information that arises
    • Progress through an environmental hierarchy from Knowledge, Understanding, & Appreciation to Stewardship.
  • Environmental Science Dual Enrollment

    Environmental Science Dual Enrollment is for students who have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater and have ACT/PLAN scores of at least 19 in Math and 18 in English. Successful completion of this course with a grade of C or better will garner the student 3 full college credits from UNO (transferrable to any accredited school). This course follows the curriculum for UNO’s Environmental Science course EES 1002 and will be taught in a similar manner.

     

    This class is a survey of environmental science and policy issues, including ecology, engineering, geology, geography, law, economics, philosophy, and sociology. Along with a lab component, this course is intended to expose students to topics in the environmental sciences (with an emphasis on local Louisiana issues). Students are assessed on the basis of exams and an independent research project.

     

    In short, this class is designed to teach students how to look at big, complex questions, apply knowledge and thought to those problems, and figure out how to solve them. This skill will be applicable throughout their lives and in every area of life, not just science.

  • Physics

    Physics is for students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Earth Science, Physical Science, Biology I, and either have completed or are concurrently enrolled in Chemistry I and Advanced Math/Trigonometry.

     

    Physics involves the study of the physical world: energy, matter, and how they are related. This course is the study of the basic concepts of physics using algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Topics include vector algebra, motion, gravity, work, energy, momentum, conservation laws, thermodynamics, states of matter, waves, electricity, and magnetism.

     

    The primary goals of Physics are providing students with:

    • An ability to represent and describe motion graphically and mathematically
    • An ability to use scientific laws and theories to support results and conclusions
    • An ability to carry out lab investigations over a variety of topics
    • Sufficient knowledge so that students will be ready for more advanced classes
    • An analytical approach to problem solving, in science and the “real world”
    • An appreciation for the role of science in society
  • Physics Honors

    Physics is the branch of science that involves the study of the physical world: energy, matter, and how they are related. This course is the study of the basic and complex concepts of physics using algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, and intended for students seeking a college major in mathematics, science, or engineering. Topics include mechanics, gravity, work, energy, momentum, conservation laws, thermodynamics, states of matter, waves, electricity, magnetism, quantum theory, solid-state electronics, and nuclear physics.

     

    The primary goal of Physics is providing students:

    • An ability to represent and describe motion graphically and mathematically
    • An ability to use scientific laws and theories to support results and conclusions
    • An understanding of electromagnetic waves and their properties
    • Sufficient knowledge in these areas so that students will be ready for more advanced classes
    • The knowledge necessary to pursue a major course of study in science or engineering
    • An analytical approach to problem solving, in science and the “real world”
    • An appreciation for the role of science in society

     

    Physics Honors is designed for students who excel in science and mathematics. It is for students who have successfully mastered the objectives of Earth Science, Physical Science, Biology I Honors, Chemistry I Honors and Advanced Math/Trigonometry Honors.

  • AP Physics

    This course will focus on the big ideas typically included in the first semester of an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics sequence and provide students with enduring understandings to support future advanced course work in the sciences. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop critical thinking and reasoning skills, as defined by the AP Science Practices.

     

    Students will cultivate their understanding of physics and science practices as they explore the following topics:

    • Kinematics
    • Dynamics: Newton’s laws
    • Circular motion and universal law of gravitation
    • Simple harmonic motion: simple pendulum and mass-spring systems
    • Impulse, linear momentum, and conservation of linear momentum
    • Collisions, elastic and inelastic
    • Work, energy, and conservation of energy
    • Rotational motion: torque, rotational kinematics and energy, rotational dynamics, and conservation of angular momentum
    • Electrostatics: electric charge and electric force
    • Electrical currents, Ohm’s law
    • DC circuits: resistors only
    • Mechanical waves and sound

     

    Students enrolled in AP Physics are required to take the AP exam given in May by CollegeBoard.

  • Sports Medicine

    The class is designed to increase the understanding of the medical aspect of sports. Through anatomy, rehabilitation techniques and hands on learning, students will work to gain the skills needed to further their education in the medical field. In addition, students will be exposed to the organization and administration of medical care to student athletes. Students will also complete comprehensive lab work in the state-of-the-art Student Center and Athletic Training Room throughout the academic year.

Holy Cross School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its policies.