Today's Schedule:   FGAB
 
 
English
 
 

Click on the headings below to read an overview of each English course offered at Holy Cross.

  • English 5

    Fifth grade English is an introduction to an integrated language arts curriculum.

    • Literature: Students are introduced to analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections reflect contemporary settings as well as cross-cultural studies. Students are also introduced to the rudiments of poetic technique and the study of folk tales, biography, and autobiography.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct sentences and paragraphs. Students focus on writing creative fiction, narration, and exposition.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students begin instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students are introduced to methods of library and electronic research and write a research paragraph.

  • English 6

    Sixth grade English is for those students who have mastered the objectives of fifth grade English. English instruction in the sixth grade continues the integrated approach to the language arts.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections reflect contemporary settings as well as cross-cultural studies and an extensive study of Greek, Roman, and Egyptian mythologies. Students are also introduced to the rudiments of poetic technique and the study of drama and short nonfiction.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct coherent and correct sentences and paragraphs. Students focus on writing narration and exposition.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a short research paper.

  • English 7

    Seventh grade English is for those students who have mastered the objectives of sixth grade English. English instruction in the seventh grade continues the integrated approach to the language arts.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections reflect the study of modern fantasy, science fiction, and an introduction to Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze informational nonfiction and oration, focusing on propaganda and persuasion. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis and drama.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a short research paper.

  • English 7 Accelerated

    Seventh grade accelerated English is for those students who have mastered the objectives of sixth grade English and have excelled in that class. They are placed in this class based on their test scores, grades, and teacher recommendation. Accelerated English instruction in the seventh grade continues with the integrated approach to the language arts. Students enrolled in this class should possess superior analysis and writing skills.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections reflect the study of modern fantasy, science fiction, and Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze informational nonfiction and oration, focusing on propaganda and persuasion. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis and drama. Reading assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion. Writing assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students are introduced to methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English 8

    • Literature: Students continue practice in reading comprehension and analysis skills in preparation for high school English. Semester readings of novels and short selections include selections from the American tradition and Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze nonfiction selections, including personal narratives, press releases, and articles. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
      • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English I

    English I is for those students who have mastered the objectives of seventh grade English. English I continues the integrated approach to the language arts.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections include selections from the American and British traditions, epic poetry, and Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze nonfiction selections. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English I Honors

    English I Honors is for those students who have mastered the objectives of seventh grade English and have excelled in that class. They are placed in this class based on their test scores, grades, and teacher recommendation. English I Honors continues with the integrated approach to the language arts. Students enrolled in this class should possess superior analysis and writing skills.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections include selections from the American and British traditions, epic poetry, and Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze nonfiction selections. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis. Reading assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion. Writing assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English II

    English II is for those students who have mastered the objectives of English I. English II continues the integrated approach to the language arts.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections include selections from the American and British traditions and Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze nonfiction selections. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English II Honors

    English II Honors is for those students who have mastered the objectives of English I and have excelled in that class. They are placed in this class based on their test scores, grades, and teacher recommendation. English II Honors continues with the integrated approach to the language arts. Students enrolled in this class should possess superior analysis and writing skills.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Semester readings of novels and short selections include selections from the American and British traditions and Shakespeare. Students frequently read and analyze nonfiction selections. Students also study techniques of poetry analysis. Reading assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct paragraphs and essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion. Writing assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English III

    English III is for those students who have mastered the objectives of English II. English III continues the integrated approach to the language arts.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. This course is a survey of American literature and includes writings from the colonial period through the present. Works include early letters and sermons; the country’s founding documents, short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Writers studied include Mather, Jefferson, Franklin, Hawthorne, Emerson, Poe, Whitman, Twain, O’Neil, Miller, Williams, Steinbeck, Hemingway, and the American poets.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English III Honors

    English III Honors is for those students who have successfully mastered the objectives of English II and have excelled in that class. They are placed in this class based on their test scores, grades, and teacher recommendation. English III Honors continues with the integrated approach to the language arts. Students enrolled in this class should possess superior analysis and writing skills.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. This course is a survey of American literature. It includes writings from the colonial period through the present. Works include early letters and sermons, the country’s founding documents, short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Writers studied include Mather, Jefferson, Franklin, Hawthorne, Emerson, Poe, Whitman, Twain, O’Neil, Miller, Williams, Steinbeck, Hemingway, and the American poets. Reading assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion. Writing assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English IV

    English IV is for those students who have mastered the objectives of English III. English IV continues the integrated approach to the language arts.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. This course is a survey of British literature. It includes writings from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the present. Works include short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Writers studied include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Bronte, Austen, Eliot, Yeats, Joyce, and Woolf, among others.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • English IV Honors

    English IV Honors is for those students who have successfully mastered the objectives of English III and have excelled in that class. They are placed in this class based on their test scores, grades, and teacher recommendation. English IV Honors continues with the integrated approach to the language arts. Students enrolled in this class should possess superior analysis and writing skills.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. This course is a survey of British literature. It includes writings from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the present. Works include short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Writers studied include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Bronte, Austen, Eliot, Yeats, Joyce, and Woolf, among others. Reading assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Writing: Students learn to construct clear and correct essays. Students focus on writing narration, exposition, and persuasion. Writing assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students.
    • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics: Students continue instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics as these skill areas apply to their writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper.

  • AP English Language IV

    Advanced Placement English Language IV is for students who have mastered and excelled in the objectives of English III Honors. It consists of both a survey of British literature and the Advanced Placement Language and Composition course. Students are invited to join this class based on their test scores, grades, teacher recommendation, and interest in the study of college level English. At the end of the course, students take the Advanced Placement test and, depending on their scores, may receive college credit in freshman introduction to writing classes.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. This course is a survey of British literature. It includes writings from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the present. Works include short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Writers studied include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Bronte, Austen, Eliot, Yeats, Joyce, and Woolf, among others. Readings and assignments in this course are specially selected for the advanced students. Because of the rhetorical focus of the class, British non-fiction writing is stressed.
    • Advanced Placement: The AP Language and Composition component of the class focuses on the analysis and interpretation of samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques, and analyzing images as text.
    • Writing: In this class, writing focuses on the rhetorical analysis and argument essays. Students apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing and create and sustain arguments based on readings, research and/or personal experience. They produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary sources. They evaluate and incorporate reference documents into researched papers.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper. Research is used in analysis and argument essays as well.

  • English V Honors - Dual Enrollment

    English V Honors is for those students who have mastered the objectives of English IV Honors and have excelled in that class. English V Honors is a college composition course that contains components of world literature. Students who complete this course earn credit for English 1001 from the University of Louisiana at Monroe.

    • Literature: Students continue practice in analysis skills. Students read short fiction drawn from world literature. Students also read essays to recognize genres of writing and sharpen critical reading and thinking skills. They respond both orally and in writing to assigned readings.
    • Writing: Students focus on writing expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary sources. They evaluate and incorporate reference documents into researched papers.

  • AP English Literature V

    Advanced Placement English Literature V is for students who have mastered and excelled in the objectives of AP English Language IV. It consists of the Advanced Placement Literature and Composition course. Students are invited to join this class based on their test scores, grades, teacher recommendations, and interest in the study of college level English. At the end of the course, students take the Advanced Placement test and, depending on their scores, may receive college credit in a sophomore-level literature survey course.

    • Literature and Advanced Placement: Students continue practice in analysis skills of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. This course is a survey of world literature. It includes writings from the British, European, and American traditions, but students are exposed to diverse voices from a range of cultural backgrounds. Writers include Dostoevsky, Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Silko, James, Hawthorne, Joyce, Keats, Dickinson, Rich, and T. S. Eliot, among others. Readings and assignments in this course are specially selected for advanced students.
    • Writing: In this class, writing focuses on the literary analysis essay. Students apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing.
    • Vocabulary: Students learn roots, multiple meaning words, and focus on the role of context in discerning the meanings of new words.
    • Research Skills: Students continue to practice methods of library and electronic research and write a research paper. Research is used in composing the analysis essay as well.

  • Speech I

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles and skills of effective public speaking. Speaking opportunities are examined in a variety of contexts. This course provides students practice in a wide array of individual speaking assignments. The fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking, methods of investigation and support, and presentation techniques will be presented.

  • Journalism I

    Journalism is focused on the written word with special emphasis paid to research and interviewing techniques. Work can vary from written stories to drawing cartoons and creating video posts. Work is due on a weekly basis and will require extensive out of class commitments. All student work is posted on our website.

  • Journalism II

    Journalism II is a continuation for students who have completed Journalism I. In this class students will focus on feature writing as well as extensive video production. Students in this class will be required to write lengthy stories, with interviews, on a weekly basis. To be in Journalism II you must have taken Journalism I.

Holy Cross School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its policies.